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Tag Archives | Stampin’ Up!

Ellison/Sizzix Patent Litigation Update

In a move likely in the works for months, Stampin’ Up has announced that they are discontinuing the Sizzix Big Shot and also are replacing Sizzix as the manufacturer for their dies. Stampin’ Up’s new dies will be a slightly different die style than the previous ones. As part of the transition to a new die manufacturer, Stampin’ Up is discontinuing (they call it “retiring”) a large number of die designs from their catalog The existing designs that are being retained in the product line will transition to the new style of die once existing inventory of the old Sizzix-manufactured die style is sold out.

In early April, Ellison laid off a significant number of staff in their U.S. office in Lake Forest, California. The layoffs, reportedly as high as 20% of the U.S. staff, included at least some of the company’s U.S.-based in-house project designers. Several of Ellison’s graphic designers also departed the company around that time, according to their LinkedIn profiles.

Ellison lawsuits

Against the backdrop of those events, four of the patent lawsuits initiated by Ellison in defense of its die patent have also continued throughout April. (To learn more about the background on these lawsuits and the patent they are alleging infringement of, click here.)

Court proceedings have been quiet in Ellison’s case against Stephanie Barnard since early March when a Special Master was appointed by the judge to assist in managing the case. The parties have entered the time-consuming (and expensive) period of litigation involving discovery and other out-of-court preparation for an eventual court trial scheduled for September 2020.

April has been taken up by relatively routine matters in the case between Ellison and Hero Arts. The two companies jointly requested a protective order from the judge to govern the handling of confidential information during the case. That order was granted on April 24th. The two sides have also agreed with the court to a schedule for the case that will lead to a trial in October 2020.

Heartfelt Creations filed a Motion to Dismiss Ellison’s case against them on April 24th. The filing claims that Ellison was too vague in their original lawsuit filing, failing to meet a sufficient burden of proof for a claim of infringement because they never pointed to a specific product of Heartfelt’s that allegedly infringes under the ‘325 patent standard. Heartfelt is asking for the lawsuit to be dismissed as a result.

Avery Elle was responsible for the most notable activity in any of Ellison’s ongoing lawsuits in April. On April 11th, Avery Elle’s lawyers filed a Motion for Sanctions against both Ellison and their lawyers. The motion accuses Ellison of filing a frivolous lawsuit to harass Avery Elle and failing to do a proper investigation before filing. Avery Elle claims that their dies do not infringe the ‘325 patent because 32% of their dies’ flat border extends into the center and the ‘325 patent describes dies with “none” of the border extending into the center.

The company went a step further in its Motion for Sanctions, however, by claiming that prior art from Spellbinders (a 2011 video and an internet archive of their website)  and Quickutz (a 2007 circle die) makes the patent itself invalid. Avery Elle also claims that Ellison should have been aware of this art, and concludes, “Ellison and its Attorneys either failed to perform a basic pre-filing investigation or they knowingly brought an objectively baseless lawsuit.”

As a result of the claims in its motion, Avery Elle is asking for the court to sanction Ellison and its attorneys by awarding attorney’s fees and other costs to them to compensate them for what they call an action that was “frivolous and filed to harass.” Attorney’s fees being awarded to a successful defendant is not the normal outcome in patent litigation. It’s only done when the court rules there has been some egregious behavior by the plaintiff in the course of the suit. (Coincidentally, the industry’s previous die patent litigation ended this way, with Spellbinders ordered to pay attorney’s fees to Quickutz.)

Ellison filed its response to the Motion for Sanctions on April 29th. To defend their lawsuit, they presented some interpretations of both the word “none” and the first claim in the patent to the court.

The original patent application demonstrated the die construction with “none” of the cutting edge extending into the center of the die with this art:

 

325 Patent Illustration - figure 4

However, Ellison (via an affidavit from ‘325 inventor Kevin Corcoran) now claims that the word “none” encompasses a lip inside the die’s vertical surface because that lip is technically part of the blade. They used this art to demonstrate their claim:

Ellison die lip blade

They also made a second argument, however, that could render that one moot. They claim the “none” description of the die lip is part of a “preamble” and not actually a technical requirement of the patent. In essence, they are trying to divorce it from the method claim of aligning a die with a stamp to cut it out. Were that argument to be successfully defended, Ellison would be the only company with the legal right to manufacture and sell open centered chemically etched dies that match stamps – regardless of whether there is an edge extending into the center or not – in the U.S.

Oral arguments are scheduled about the motion on May 13th in U.S. District Court in the Southern District of California before Judge Marilyn Huff.

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Update | Cuttlebug, Copic, Hobby Lobby, Michaels, JOANN, & More!

With the start of the new year and trade shows happening, we have lots of catching up to do with the craft industry news! So let’s get started!

[Disclaimer: Some links in this article are affiliate links that pay this site a commission at no cost to the reader when a purchase is made after a click.]

Cricut Cuttlebug

Cutting. Cricut has made two big product announcements recently. Fans of the Cuttlebug will be disappointed to learn that the die cut machine and its accessories are being discontinued. Those still wanting one (or supplies for one they already own) can shop while supplies last at Cricut.com.

Files from one of the most popular sources of SVG files for use on die cutting machines are now available in Cricut Access. Miss Kate Cuttables has launched several new collections in Cricut Access, including Spring Has Sprung, Springtime, All You Need Is Love, Be Mine Valentine, Love Letters, and Valentine’s Day.

Closing. Furniture chain Hemispheres, which was founded in 2001 by Hobby Lobby’s David Green, will be closing. The company’s vendors have been told the store will be placing no further inventory orders. Hemispheres’ eight stores in Texas and Oklahoma will close later this year after selling through existing and already-purchased inventory.

Closing 2. Impress Cards + Crafts has been serving Seattle-area paper crafters since 1987. But on February 23rd it will close its University Village store in Seattle, leaving only its Tukwilla location.

Closing 3. Scrapbook Store & More in Greenfield, Wisconsin will be closing their doors on March 31st. The owner, citing health problems and a changing scrapbook market, has announced plans to open a craft retreat house in late spring or early summer 2019 that will sleep 10-12 people.

Every store closure is a loss to the industry, of course. But this particular store is noteworthy as the store that started the scrapbooking career of a young Stephanie Hunt (aka Stephanie Smokovich) – now known to scrapbookers worldwide as the founder and designer of Bella Blvd.

Changes. In yet another sign of the decline of the popularity of pocket cards, Kelly Purkey has announced changes to her  monthly subscription club. The subscription traditionally included pocket cards and an exclusive stamp set. A second subscription option will now be made available moving forward that includes only the stamps, without the cards. The new stamp-only subscription will cost $16/month for a 12 month subscription.

Direct. Too Marker, the manufacturer of Copic markers, has announced that they are discontinuing their distribution agreement with Imagination International in the United States for the popular markers. Instead, the company plans to sell the markers directly themselves to the U.S. market.

Channels. Tonic Studios announced this week that they are changing channels. The company, which has long partnered with Hochanda for TV shopping sales, is jumping to Create and Craft TV starting in March 2019. Click here to see the full announcement.

Legal. After settling their patent infringement lawsuit against Tonic Studios in July, My Sweet Petunia moved on to another target in October: Stampin’ Up. In a widely anticipated move, My Sweet Petunia filed suit against Stampin’ Up in October 2018 alleging the company was infringing its patents on the MISTI tool by selling its Stamparatus tool. Stampin’ Up! has filed counter-claims against My Sweet Petunia challenging, among other things, the validity of one of My Sweet Petunia’s patents.

stamp-n-storage magnet sheets

Stamp-n-Storage magnet sheets in use

Wholesale. Stamp-n-Storage, which produces storage options for scrapbookers and card makers, is entering the wholesale market with its popular magnet cards for storing thin metal dies. All four sizes of Stamp-n-Storage magnet cards (5×7, 6×7, 8×7 and 8.5×11) were on display to retailers at the recent Creativation show in Phoenix. The company had previously marketed its products only via its own website and at consumer craft shows such as Stamp & Scrapbook Expo.

Adjustments. Facing a shrinking market for her company’s core Project Life products, Becky Higgins has shared with fans some major changes being taken to help ensure the health of the company moving forward. The company’s physical office space has been shut down, with all staff working from home now. The Good Life product line – the company’s foray into lifestyle products – is also going away. And they are also stopping exhibiting at consumer shows and shipping product internationally from their online store. Finally, they are discontinuing their affiliate marketing program.

In the email to consumers discussing the changes, Becky promised fans would see more video content containing Project Life projects soon, along with more online courses for the Becky Higgins classroom. The company also is planning what she described as “an adjustment in how we offer / package the Project Life product,” which may be a welcome change to many scrapbookers if it includes fewer duplicates of the 3×4 cards. Too many duplicates of those cards is a common complaint among Project Life core kit purchasers.

Chains. Michaels has announced it is closing all of the 36 Pat Catan’s stores in Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. The company acquired the Pat Catan stores three years ago when it bought Lamrite West, the parent company of Darice and Pat Catan’s. At the time of the acquisition, Michaels’ public statements pointed to Darice as the motivation for the acquisition, so the announcement of the retail stores’ impending closure is not particularly surprising. Michaels says it intends to rebrand up to 12 of the stores as Michaels stores and reopen them in the 2019 fiscal year. The company will also continue to maintain a warehouse for its wholesale business in Strongsville, Ohio.

“After a comprehensive review, we have decided to close all of the Pat Catan’s retail stores. We expect to rebrand and reopen up to 12 stores as new Michaels stores in fiscal 2019, and we will continue to maintain a support center and distribution center in Strongsville, Ohio to support our growing wholesale business. We believe these changes will provide more value for customers and shareholders by enabling us to leverage a more consistent merchandise assortment and eliminate duplicative retail operating expenses,” says Chuck Rubin, Chairman and CEO of The Michaels Companies. “This was not an easy decision, and I am grateful for the contributions of our Pat Catan’s Team Members. As we work through the closing process, we intend to provide employment opportunities or transition support for all Team Members.”

People. JOANN Stores has a new CEO to replace Jill Soltau, who left for JC Penney in October 2018 – and it’s a familiar face. Wade Miquelon, who had been serving as interim President and CEO since Soltau’s departure, was appointed last week as her permanent replacement. He was also given a seat on the Board of Directors as well. Miquelon joined JOANN as EVP and CFO in March 2016, and came to JOANN from The Walgreen Company.

Cruising. Michaels is partnering with Carnival Cruise Line to be their exclusive arts and crafts provider for their fleet of 26 cruise ships. Onboard ship, Carnival Cruise Line customers will have access to a variety of “Make It With Michaels” craft experiences that will rotate seasonally. And this spring, Michaels will host Carnival Cruise-themed classes in their stores.

“As we continue our mission to make it easy for parents to provide their kids with more mindful, screen-free fun, we are excited to partner with Carnival Cruise Line to inspire creativity at sea,” said Steve Carlotti, Michaels EVP of Marketing. “Carnival carries more than 5.2 million guests every year, including 800,000 kids, and this program will give guests of all ages a new and creative way to interact with our brand. As the number one player in the arts and crafts space, we are the preferred destination for making and creative play, and this new partnership is another way we are solidifying our leadership position.”

To celebrate the program’s launch, the companies are giving away five Carnival Cruises between now and April 30th. You can enter to win on the Carnival Cruise website.

Dates. Speaking of getting away, Jenn Shurkus has announced the 2019 dates for her Creative Journey Art Retreats on Cape Cod. The spring retreat will be April 27th-28th, and the fall retreat is November 2nd-November 3rd. Registration for the spring retreat opens February 17th at 9am ET.

Sold. U.K.-based Coats has sold its North American Crafts business to Spinrite, the Canadian manufacturer of yarn brands such as Caron, Bernat and Lily Sugar n’ Cream, for initial cash consideration of $37 million. The acquisition brings brands like Red Heart, Susan Bates, Aunt Lydia and Coats & Clark to Spinrite.

Reading:

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Jo-Ann’s Ignites Social Firestorm with Anti-Tariff Advocacy

Jo-Ann Stores launched a political advocacy program last week to oppose new tariffs on product imports from overseas. The result, predictable with anything remotely political these days, was an avalanche of vitriol.

Jo-Ann Made in America Tax

The advocacy program poorly framed the tariffs as a “Made in America tax” in an attempt to stress that the tariffs will make items handmade by American crafters more expensive. (The goal of the campaign is to get crafters to contact their Representatives and Senators via the site linked above.) This high concept slogan fell loudly flat with its intended audience, it seems. Some were just confused by the campaign, seeming to think Jo-Ann’s was claiming that the tariffs applied to American products. Other recipients of the campaign’s email and social posts expressed that they found the wording deceptive.

Many of the outraged commenters on Jo-Ann’s post on Facebook have vowed to boycott the company in the future for engaging in politics. The most popular alternative boycotters are promising to seek out by far is Hobby Lobby, a good indication that the outrage is more about about the specific position that Jo-Ann’s is taking (opposing a policy of President Trump) than that they are engaging in politics in general. Based on the previous experience of Hobby Lobby, Starbucks, and Target – all of whom are thriving after similar consumer boycott threats – Jo-Ann probably doesn’t have much to worry about.

Jo-Ann Stores isn’t the only major craft retailer who has spoken out against the tariffs. Back in March, when the tariffs were initially proposed, Michaels Companies joined Jo-Ann Stores (and 24 other retailers) in signing a public letter opposing the tariffs that was organized by the Retail Industry Leaders Association.

So why would Jo-Ann Stores (and Michaels in a smaller way) voluntarily venture into a political issue that they had to know would cause backlash? The fact, basically, that they were willing to wade into this mire at all is telling of just how serious they believe the China tariffs are for their business. (And this assessment can be extrapolated to virtually all other craft businesses as well.)

What has Joann’s sounding the alarm? As of last Friday (the 24th), a 25% tariff (import tax) now applies to all virtually all craft category products that are imported from China. Jo-Ann’s is highlighting the following items from the tariff list in its campaign:

  • Candle Holders (9405.50.40)
  • Cookie Cutters (8205.51.30)
  • Faux Fur (6001.10.20)
  • Feather Craft and Décor Articles (6701.00.30)
  • Fleece (6001.22.00)
  • Glass Beads (7018.10.50)
  • Glue (3506.10.50)
  • Knit Fabric (6005.37.00, 6004.10.00, 6006.44.00)
  • Magnifying Glasses (9013.80.20)
  • Metal Beads (8308.90.30, 8308.10.00)
  • Paper Cutting Machines (8441.10.00)
  • Paper Products (4823.90.67, 4823.90.86)
  • Twig/Vine Baskets (4602.19.18)
  • Velour and Similar Fabrics (6001.92.00)
  • Vine Wreaths and Décor (4602.19.60)
  • Washi and other Paper Tape (4811.41.21)
  • Woven Cotton Fabric (5208.52.30, 5208.32.30, 5208.52.40, 5208.32,40, 5208.12.60, 5208.22.60, 5806.20.00),
  • Woven Manmade Fabric (Poly, Nylon, etc) (5407.61.99, 5513.21.00)
  • Yarn (5606.00.00, 5511.10.00)

A close examination of the tariff list also shows more items like clay, paints, stamping foils, inks, drawing ink, film, paper, metals, buttons, glue, and sewing machines that are likely to either directly or indirectly raise prices on craft products.

Products that are manufactured in the United States won’t be safe from tariff price increases, either. With items such as chalk, mica, wax, dyes, coloring matter, pigments, printing ink, inks, natural rubber, synthetic rubber, paper, metal, and printing plates and many wood items also on the tariff list, many American craft product manufacturers will find themselves paying higher prices for the raw materials used to produce even their U.S.-made products.

Jill Soltau, CEO of Jo-Ann Stores, told Fox Business last week that two-thirds of the products the company sells are sourced from China, and that no alternatives are available outside China that can meet their quantity and quality specifications. She said Jo-Ann Stores expects that consumers will see a 25% price increase on most products as a result of the tariffs.

The new tariffs are of concern in several ways for the financial health of the crafts industry. Sudden significant price increases may lead some consumers to opt out of the industry altogether due to a decrease in the perceived value they are receiving. Other consumers may find their discretionary hobby spending involuntarily limited by budget constraints caused by tariff-related price increases on non-discretionary household spending. Consumers who remain active in the industry will find their dollar not going as far – the same dollars buying fewer SKU units. Since wholesale and production prices for most items are based on volume ordered by the company, fewer SKUs being turned over could lead to increased wholesale prices – thus leading to even more consumer price increases and a vicious circle of inflation.

One of the Trump administration’s stated motivations for putting the tariffs in place is due to Chinese companies’ violation of U.S. intellectual property. This has been a major problem for U.S. craft companies on platforms like Alibaba, where blatant copies of popular stamp manufacturers’ designs are sold to U.S. consumers with barely any recourse for the companies. Stampin’ Up! made an attempt to file a copyright infringement suit against Alibaba Hong Kong Ltd in U.S. District Court in Utah in April, but then withdrew the suit for unknown reasons six weeks later before Alibaba even filed a response.

Will the cure (tariffs) be worse than the disease (copyright infringement) for the crafts industry? Only time will tell.

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Update | Martha Stewart, Craftsy, Snap, Jobs, Dave Grohl, and More!

Support. A Gofundme campaign has been established to help Bella Blvd founder Stephanie Smokovich with medical expenses. Stephanie, for those who haven’t heard, was diagnosed with brain cancer after experiencing a seizure shortly after Creativation. She has already undergone surgery (and a lengthy hospital stay) to remove the tumor and is now facing radiation and chemotherapy treatment. You can keep up with Stephanie’s progress on her Caring Bridge site.

[Sending you hugs and wishing you a speedy return to running marathons, Steph!]

Video. Craftsy Unlimited is now available for subscribers in the U.S. to watch on Roku streaming devices. At a cost of $14.95/month or $120/year, the channel is similar in price to other premium channels available on the device like HBO.

Moving On. SNAP! Conference founder Tauni Everett announced at the annual conference last weekend that she has sold the event and will be moving on to other projects. Mandy Beyeler of Sugar Bee Crafts and Kim West of A Girl & A Glue Gun are the event’s new owners.

Contests. Duck Brand has launched its annual Stuck At Prom contest awarding prizes for prom clothes made out of Duck Tape. This year, instead of awarding prizes to couples, Duck is awarding two grand prizes – one for a tux and one for a dress.

Revamp. Stampin’ Up! has announced their annual update to their color palette – and it’s a big one. In addition to announcing a new In Color palette, that company has completely revamped their core color palette as well. The palette still has four color groups with ten colors in them, but a new group of Basics has been created to hold the colors basic black, whisper white and vanilla. Thirteen core colors are being retired along with the In Color group that is due for retirement. Because of this, there are 21 new colors being added to the Stampin’ Up! color palette in the revamp. (Flirty Flamingo actually appears on both the retirement and new color lists. It is being retired as an In Color and added to the core collection.)

Along with the color revamp, Stampin’ Up! is also refreshing their iconic ink pads. The new cases are slightly smaller, stackable, open more easily, and close tighter. But the changes aren’t just cosmetic. Stampin’ Up! has also made a change to their ink formulation that they say will reduce bubbling in the ink and give better stamp impressions. For more details on all of these changes, visit Stamp Your Art Out.

Martha, Martha, Martha. Lifestyle icon Martha Stewart has several big new products rolling out at Michaels. Ten new themed collections are being added to the Martha Stewart Celebration line of party supplies. There’s classics like gold, or black & white, along with trendy Meyer Lemon and even Iridescent (complete with the requisite unicorns).

In addition to the party collection. Martha and Cricut are pairing up for a Martha Stewart special edition Cricut Explore Air 2 machine. The machine’s bundle includes a special Martha Stewart tool set and 25 free Ready to Make Martha Stewart projects. Currently available for order for $279.99 on the Michaels website, the machine bundle will be available in-store at Michaels on May 4th.

Martha Stewart Cricut Explore Air 2

Martha Stewart had previously partnered with Cricut for a Martha Stewart-branded version of the Cricut Cake machine.

Shopping. Bella Blvd has joined the ranks of manufacturers who are selling direct-to-consumer online. Their newly-launched retail store can be reached at www.bellablvd.net

Crime. A JOANN store in Lansing, Michigan was the site of a murder-suicide on March 26th. Store employee Rachel Renee Duncan’s ex-boyfriend, against whom she had recently secured a protective order, murdered her with a gun stolen from a local gun range before turning the gun on himself. At least 15 people were inside the store at the time of the murder, according to police. An unidentified store employee told the Lansing State Journal that counseling services were being made available to store employees by JOANN.

[Disclosure: The following item contains Amazon affiliate links that pay this site a commission at no cost to the reader when a purchase is made after a click.]

Books. Designer Amy Tan’s publisher has republished her 2017 book Craft A Life You Love: Infusing Creativity, Fun And Intention Into Your Everyday. The new edition hit stores earlier this month.

Lia Griffith Cutting Machine Crafts

Lia Griffith’s new book on digital die cutting will be available on May 1st. Cutting Machine Crafts with Your Cricut, Sizzix or Silhouette includes instructions for 50 projects and 60 downloadable SVG files for readers to use to create the projects.

Careers. Have you ever wondered how you could turn your career into a craft career? Brittany Luiz talked to PR Daily about how she turned a career as a journalist into a position as the PR and media relations manager at Tombow.

Cool Crafters. You never know who you might run into at your favorite craft store. ICYMI earlier this year, apparently when Dave Grohl isn’t busy being a rock star he hangs out at Michaels in his spare time. (Definitely worth clicking the link just for the crafty Foo Fighter lyric puns.)

Jobs. The following industry jobs are currently listed as available:

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Stampin’ Up! Overhauls Color Palette

Stampin’ Up! announced Tuesday that the company is overhauling their core color palette with the release of the 2010-2011 catalog this summer and making major changes to their product offerings.

The changes will go into effect on July 1st and will create a new 40 color core color palette at Stampin’ Up!. It will include five completely new colors: Marina Mist, Cajun Crazy, Cherry Cobbler, Early Espresso and Daffodil Delight.  Ten previous In Colors will be made part of the new core color palette: Melon Mambo, Rich Razzleberry, Pacific Point, Tangerine Tango, River Rock, Soft Suede, Riding Hood Red, Pink Pirouette, Baja Breeze, and Wild Wasabi.

* new colors

Neutral colors will now be part of the core palette instead of a separate palette. Sahara Sand, Very Vanilla, Whisper White, Basic Gray, and Basic Black from the former neutrals palette will be part of the new core palette. The existing color Kraft will be renamed Crumb Cake for the new palette. The rest of the 25 core palette colors will be drawn from the existing Stampin Up core palette: Regal Rose, Tempting Turquoise, Old Olive, Pumpkin Pie, Real Red, Chocolate Chip, Elegant Eggplant, Night of Navy, Not Quite Navy, Always Artichoke, Garden Green, More Mustard, Bravo Burgundy, Pretty In Pink, Rose Red, Perfect Plum, Bashful Blue, Certainly Celery, and So Saffron.

Palette colors will be reorganized into four color collections, called Brights, Neutrals, Regals and Subtles. In addition to the 40 core colors, each year there will be five new In Colors, which will have a life of two years.

The overhaul will also mean a large group of colors will be retiring. Thirty colors will be retiring in all, unavailable after the end of June 2010:

Kits of new colors for items such as card stock, markers, classic ink pads, pastels and watercolor crayons will be available for sale to help Stampin’ Up! fans fill in their color collections and transition to the new core colors.

The new color offerings will be smaller than previously, 50 in all when the second set of rotating In Colors is added next year. By comparison, the 2009-2010 catalog offers 62 colors. Stampin’ Up! explained the reasons for the reduction:

We retired colors based on sales history and focus group feedback. Members of our focus groups indicated that they had some colors they didn’t use; for instance, they purchased a whole family of ink pads and then rarely used some of the colors in that family. In addition, sales on many colors were very low, and the cost to support those colors was not worth the return. We were careful to choose the most popular and up-to-date colors.

Another reason we reduced the number of colors is that we wanted our collections to be less overwhelming to new demonstrators and customers—we wanted it to be easier for new stampers to get started. And with fewer colors in each collection, demonstrators and customers can save money and use that money to purchase more of what they love—stamps, accessories, and other items.

Stampin’ Up! is making other moves that seem influenced by the current economy as well. Besides reducing the selection of offered colors, Stampin’ Up! is also almost completely eliminating a long-offered product. Full sized Craft Stampin’ Pads will be available after July 1st only in Basic Black, Whisper White, and Very Vanilla. The Craft Stampin’ Spots mini ink pads will continue to be offered for the full core color palette, along with the ink refills for them.

The pigment ink Craft Stampin’ pads, at $7.50, have been the more expensive of the two ink options offered by Stampin’ Up!. Their dye ink Classic Stampin’ pads are priced at $5.95. A 12 count color collection set Classic Stampin’ Spots sells for $22.50, while the Craft Stampin’ Spots sell for $25.95. (These Stampin’ Spot collection prices will likely change in the new catalog since the new collections will have 10 instead of 12 colors in them.)

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