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Easy DIY Holiday Cards with Cricut Maker

Hello Cricut lovers! The snow is flying up north and cooks across the country are prepping their Thanksgiving turkey menus, so that must mean it is time to talk DIY Holiday Cards!

[Disclosure: This is a sponsored post written on behalf of Cricut, but all opinions expressed are my own.]

Today, I’m bringing you two clean and simple DIY holiday card designs that, with the help of Cricut Maker and a few of my favorite Cricut tools, will make easy work of your handmade holiday cards without sacrificing creativity or style!

Cricut Merry Christmas house card

Supplies Needed:

The first step to making this handmade holiday card is to cut all of the pieces out on your Cricut Maker machine. The card base requires the use of both a Cricut pen and the single Scoring Wheel.

Creating Card Base on Cricut Maker

When you peel the card base off of the mat, some of the waste from those tiny faux stitching spots will cling in the holes. That just happens when a cut is so tiny. The piercer from the Cricut Papercrafting Tool Set is the perfect solution for getting rid of these hangers-on! Just use its tiny point to poke the pieces that need to be removed, and they will pop right out!

Using Cricut Scraper Tool

This homemade holiday card can be infinitely customized to create different looks using different cardstock and patterned papers…and it’s a great way to use up your scraps!

DIY Holiday Cards with Cricut Maker

Using the knife blade to cut basswood is simple if you remember a few simple things. It will cut up to 3/32″ thick, and your cuts can’t be smaller than 1/2″ in size. (That includes interior cuts in your shapes.)

To do the actual cutting, tape your basswood down to a purple (Strong Grip) Cricut cutting mat with masking tape. Make sure it is in the upper left hand corner of the measurement grid, but not outside it. See those little white wheels spread along the middle area of the steel roller bars? Slide those white wheels to the right so they are outside of the area where your basswood will pass under. Then you can load your Cricut Knife Blade in the adaptive tool system, and follow the on screen prompts in Cricut Design Space to select your material and load the mat into the machine.

Cutting Wood Veneer with Cricut Maker

After you have completed cutting all of your pieces, you should have all of these elements, ready to assemble your homemade holiday card! Layer your house together, and adhere it to the front of your card. Your DIY holiday card is complete!

DIY Holiday Card pieces

Mid-century modern, and the pastel Christmas that goes with it, is very trendy. The same techniques and Cricut tools that I used to make that cute country Christmas card above can be used to bring a taste of retro mid-century to your Christmas cards.

Retro DIY Holiday Cards with Cricut

Supplies Needed:

(If you like the design but aren’t a fan of pastel Christmas, try making this DIY holiday card with a dark background, and dark green or silver trees for a midnight on Christmas Eve look.)

To make this card, first cut out all of the elements of the handmade holiday card design using your Cricut Maker machine and the project file. (Follow the instructions above on how to cut out the wood tree from basswood for the left side of the card.)

Once all of the elements are cut out, paint the wooden tree with Plaid FolkArt Pickle Wash following the instructions on the bottle. (I chose that particular paint because it allows the grain of the wood to show through, so the person receiving your DIY holiday card can see that the tree is actually wood!)

Painting wood veneer for DIY Holiday Cards

While your paint dries, grab the Distresser tool from the Cricut Papercrafting Tool Set and get to work rubbing it along the edges of the tree with the sentiment on it! Distressing that edge gives it more dimension, and adds interest to that tree so that it can hold its own in the design with the other two elements.

distressed edge on diy holiday card

Once all of your elements are prepared, you can quickly assemble them.

Cutting the stars out of the Cricut Adhesive Foil means that these small items are easy to adhere. (Plus the foil cuts so beautifully at these miniature sizes!) The paper piercer from the Cricut Papercrafting Tool Set is your secret shortcut for getting perfect placement of tiny sticky items like this! No more getting them stuck to your fingers, or to each other… just pop the end of the piercer under them and use it as a tiny wand to lay them down with! Place them, put your finger on top to hold them in place, and slip the piercer out from underneath. (Do this carefully, because it is a piercer, after all!) Then just press and rub firmly to make sure the foil adheres well!

Cricut paper piercer

I can’t wait to see how you all customize these DIY holiday cards for your family and friends! Tag me at @scrapbookupdate on Instagram to share yours!

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.

 

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Make a Watercolor Fall Leaf Card with Cricut Scoring Wheel!

Fall is starting to sound really good with the July heat here in Florida! So today, I decided to bring some cool fall weather to my studio with the help of my Cricut Maker and the new Cricut Scoring Wheel.

[Disclosure: This is a sponsored post for Cricut.]

Fall Watercolor Card with Cricut Scoring Wheel

When I first got my Cricut Scoring Wheel for my Cricut Maker, I was going over a list of the materials that the Cricut Double Scoring Wheel will work with: shimmer paper….sparkle paper…watercolor paper…heavy cardstock…. Wait! Back that bus up! Did that say watercolor paper?

It did! Because the new Cricut Scoring Wheel works in the Adaptive Tool slot of the Cricut Maker machine, it has up to 10x the scoring pressure of the previous Scoring Stylus. And that means that it can create scoring lines in materials like 140lb watercolor paper that the stylus just can’t stand up to.

I love using watercolor techniques – and thus watercolor paper – in my card making. But the challenge it brings is that watercolor paper is extremely heavy and doesn’t fold well. So working with up until now meant making a separate card front with it, or having to design my card so that the watercolor was an element not the whole card front. It was limiting.

Being able to create score lines in watercolor paper with the Cricut Double Scoring Wheel means creative freedom from all of those limitations. I really pushed the limits of my new freedom for this card. I created a card that is a watercolor paper base, and has a see-through element as well.

Supplies Used:

Cricut Double Scoring Wheel lines

The Cricut Double Scoring Wheel makes two scoring lines close together. This creates a more gradual fold that doesn’t break the surface of the material when folding heavier materials like foil paper, cereal boxes, kraft board, lightweight chipboard, and more. (Don’t worry if you aren’t certain which Cricut Scoring Wheel is the correct one for your material. Your Cricut Maker machine will tell you which one to use after you select your material in Design Space!)

Cricut Scoring Wheel in Cricut Maker machine

There is one other benefit of the new Cricut Scoring Wheel working in the Adaptive Tool slot of the Cricut Maker machine – it leaves the pen slot open! This means that drawing and scoring can be done in one set-up of the machine (assuming you are only using one pen color). With the Scoring Stylus, you have to do the pen, then the machine stops and you have to swap the pen for the the stylus before you can score. The new process of being able to do them both at once is much more efficient!

To start my watercolor fall leaf card project, I cut the project out on my Cricut Maker. I cut the main part out of watercolor paper, the frame for the front out of shimmer paper, and the back for the window out of foil acetate.

Fall Watercolor Card prep

Once my pieces were cut I used my art tape to tape my card base down to a surface for painting. (Painter’s tape would also work.) I also used the tape to cover the sentiment that was done in pen by my Cricut Maker, and also to create a border around the window to keep my watercolor from migrating. It only takes a few moments to do this, and it is a good way to prevent paint disasters. Also, if the card base isn’t taped down, the watercolor paper will curl when it dries after painting.

Fall Watercolor Card in Progress

My first layer of watercolor was started with an olive green color from my watercolor set. I used my waterbrush and just made random dabs of the olive from the palette onto the dry watercolor paper. Then I spritzed the leaf lightly with water. I grabbed a clean watercolor brush and started filling in between the green with a nice saturated yellow. Then I spritzed again to make it blend well. To speed the drying process, I used a heat gun.

Fall Card marker edges

After the green and yellow was dry, I started my next watercolor layer. The next layer was a reddish-orange color. I used a small waterbrush for applying this color, and then spritzed it to blend it. Then I dried it with the heat gun again.

The final layer was some brown, applied the same way as the red. In addition to making random spots, I also filled in the stem with the brown, and painted along the vein lines with it.

When I was done painting, I used a brown brush marker lightly edge along the leaf and frame to cover the white edges. I also colored just a little bit of the front of the opening. I also did the same thing to the white edges of the shimmer paper frame. All of this provides a more “finished” look to my die cuts, and creates a sort of drop shadow effect.

Fall Watercolor Card assembled

Once my watercolor was all dry, I very carefully removed the tape. Then I assembled the card elements. The Cricut Foil Acetate perfectly matches the Geode Cricut pen I used for the sentiment, and adds a sort of blue sky sparkle to the card. The Cricut Shimmer Paper that I used for the frame picks up the fall colors of the leaf, and makes it a bit more festive.

The final step, of course, is to use the beautiful double scoring lines to fold my finished card! Folding the 140lb watercolor paper was surprisingly easy with the lines from my Cricut Double Scoring Wheel, and I got a perfect edge!

And here is the result!

Fall Watercolor Card with Cricut Scoring Wheel

I chose a “thinking of you” sentiment for my card but the design is suitable for lots of fall uses – a simple hello, happy birthday, and many others. Anna Griffin has a whole bunch of similar sentiment designs to choose from to make it easy to adapt this card to whatever use you need!

Watercolor Fall Leaf Card with Cricut Scoring Wheel

What occasion will use the Cricut Double Scoring Wheel for?

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.

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